The demand for clean energy has never been higher, and it has created a global race to develop new technologies as alternatives to fossil fuels. Among the most tantalizing of these green energy technologies is fuel cells. They use hydrogen as fuel to cleanly produce electricity and could power everything from long-haul trucks to major industrial processes.

An international research team that includes scientists and engineers from The University of Texas at Austin has devised a new method for making urea that is more environmentally friendly than today’s process and produces enough to be competitive with energy-intensive industrial methods.

Alumna Amiee Quon, test chamber engineer for NASA's Mars Helicopter, shares her story of achieving big goals and inspiring others to do the same.

Three years ago, Arthur Ashkin won the Nobel Prize for inventing optical tweezers, which use light in the form of a high-powered laser beam to capture and manipulate particles. Despite being created decades ago, optical tweezers still lead to major breakthroughs and are widely used today to study biological systems.

A pair of startups powered by technology created in labs at the Cockrell School of Engineering have raised fresh rounds of funding to continue their growth.

Dr. Tanya Hutter, an Assistant Professor in the Walker Department of Mechanical Engineering has been selected as a winner of the L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science – 2021 Ambassador Fund for her program Women Ahead of Their Time.

Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Professor Guihua Yu, has just been selected for 2021 Class of the prestigious Blavatnik National Awards Honorees for Young Scientists.

The Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin has named Donald Siegel, a professor at the University of Michigan and an internationally recognized computational materials scientist, as the next chair of UT’s Walker Department of Mechanical Engineering. He will assume his position on Sept. 1, 2021, succeeding the department’s current chair, Rick Neptune.

The push to improve at-home medical technology is integral to lowering costs of health care by keeping people out of hospitals and doctors' offices for routine tasks. Diagnostics are an important part of that, allowing people to detect potential diseases earlier when treatment is less invasive and the chance of recovery is higher.

Texas Engineering alumnus Chetan Kapoor, who leads R&D at Yaskawa American, Motoman Robotics Division, spearheaded a new partnership initiative between Yaskawa and UT Austin with the gift of a dual-arm SDA10F robot that will be available to Texas Robotics faculty. The partnership aims to facilitate interdisciplinary research and innovation within the robotics community in the university.