The Welch Foundation, one of the nation’s largest private funding organizations for basic chemical research, has established The Peter B. Dervan Distinguished Lecture Series, an endowed lectureship at The University of Texas at Austin.

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As much as a third of the world’s population does not have access to clean drinking water, according to some estimates, and half of the population could live in water-stressed areas by 2025. Finding a solution to this problem could save and improve lives for millions of people, and it is a high priority among scientists and engineers around the globe.

The Walker Department of Mechanical Engineering is seeking applications for multiple tenure-track faculty positions as well as non-tenure track lecturers

There's a global race to reduce the amount of harmful gases in our atmosphere to slow down the pace of climate change, and one way to do that is through carbon capture and sequestration — sucking carbon out of the air and burying it. At this point, however, we're capturing only a fraction of the carbon needed to make any kind of dent in climate change.

Arumugam Manthiram, Professor in the Walker Department of Mechanical Engineering and Director of the Texas Materials Institute at UT Austin, is receiving the 2021 Battery Division Technology Award from The Electrochemical Society (ECS).

The University of Texas at Austin and the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) have inked a partnership that aims to solve challenges in humanitarian response through engineering innovations.

A team of Texas Engineering undergraduate students took a colorful approach to the 2021 Cornell Theme Park Design Competition and won two out of five competition categories, placing second overall.

Our electrical infrastructure has remained largely unchanged since World War II, but advances in technology — specifically materials — opened doors we never would have thought possible in the past. These advances have set the stage to redesign our electrical infrastructure for the next 100 years and beyond.

The demand for clean energy has never been higher, and it has created a global race to develop new technologies as alternatives to fossil fuels. Among the most tantalizing of these green energy technologies is fuel cells. They use hydrogen as fuel to cleanly produce electricity and could power everything from long-haul trucks to major industrial processes.

An international research team that includes scientists and engineers from The University of Texas at Austin has devised a new method for making urea that is more environmentally friendly than today’s process and produces enough to be competitive with energy-intensive industrial methods.