Evaluation of a Catalytic Air Cleaning System and Design of a Modular Rack System

Photo of Tom Burrows, Mary Hoskison, Ryan Myers, Alex Pazzaglini Students: Tom Burrows, Mary Hoskison, Ryan Myers, Alex Pazzaglini

Sponsor: Trane

Date: Spring 2013

Requirements:
The project was divided into two parts with different requirements. The primary constraint of the testing phase was completion of testing and analysis in a timely manner. The primary requirements of the modular rack are that it be stackable, load bearing, freestanding, and easy to install. The rack must facilitate maintenance access to change the bulbs at regular intervals.

Problem:
The team was tasked with performing test using Aircuity sensor equipment to determine the effectiveness of the Trane Catalytic Air Cleaning System (TCACS). Effectiveness is defined as the system's ability to remove volatile organic compounds, mold spores, and other measurable quantities from the air. The team was also tasked with designing a standardized modular rack system that can easily connect photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) panels.

Solution:
The TCACS system was installed in one of the air handlers in the ETC building while leaving the other air handler in its current configuration. Testing was conducted prior to the installation to establish a baseline for the area. An upstream test was also performed at the system inlets so that the quality of the air entering the system was known. Test results confirmed that the VOC level after installation is roughly 60% of the magnitude prior to installation. The modular rack utilizes a frame that acts as an exoskeleton for each individual panel. The frame has sockets on all sides that would allow it to interconnect to other frames of the same design via pins. Finite element analysis ensures that the rack can support the loads required by its intended application.

Images related to the project:

Photo related to Evaluation of a Catalytic Air Cleaning System and Design of a Modular Rack System project
Joomla SEF URLs by Artio